How Reciprocal Access to Tibet should be implemented—and what you can do to help!

The Reciprocal Access to Tibet Act (RATA) is the most important Tibet legislation in the United States since 2002. This landmark law takes aim at China’s double standard of preventing American diplomats, journalists and ordinary citizens—including thousands of Tibetan-Americans—from entering Tibet, even though Chinese citizens travel freely throughout the US.

Under RATA, Chinese officials involved in keeping Americans out of Tibet will be denied entry to the US—unless China changes it policies.

RATA was signed into law in December 2018. Now, the time has come for it to be fully implemented.

What the State Department will do
The Secretary of State will identify those Chinese officials who are substantially involved in the formulation or execution of policies related to access for foreigners to Tibetan areas and will revoke those officials’ visas or other documentation to enter or be present in the United States.

What ICT will do
The International Campaign for Tibet (ICT) is compiling information about the experiences of Americans, including Tibetan-Americans, who have applied to visit Tibet. This information will be used to prepare briefings on the status of reciprocity that Americans have in accessing Tibet. ICT will use these briefings in our work with Congress and the White House.

What YOU can do
Have you applied for a visa to visit Tibet recently or in the past few years? Whether your application was accepted or denied, we want to hear about your experience. Provide ICT with feedback, including a description of the process, required permits and other measures that impeded your freedom to travel to Tibetan areas. Feedback will be kept confidential and can be shared through this quick online questionnaire.

How Reciprocal Access to Tibet should be implemented—and what you can do to help!

The Reciprocal Access to Tibet Act (RATA) is the most important Tibet legislation in the United States since 2002. This landmark law takes aim at China’s double standard of preventing American diplomats, journalists and ordinary citizens—including thousands of Tibetan-Americans—from entering Tibet, even though Chinese citizens travel freely throughout the US.

Under RATA, Chinese officials involved in keeping Americans out of Tibet will be denied entry to the US—unless China changes it policies.

RATA was signed into law in December 2018. Now, the time has come for it to be fully implemented.

What the State Department will do
The Secretary of State will identify those Chinese officials who are substantially involved in the formulation or execution of policies related to access for foreigners to Tibetan areas and will revoke those officials’ visas or other documentation to enter or be present in the United States.

What ICT will do
The International Campaign for Tibet (ICT) is compiling information about the experiences of Americans, including Tibetan-Americans, who have applied to visit Tibet. This information will be used to prepare briefings on the status of reciprocity that Americans have in accessing Tibet. ICT will use these briefings in our work with Congress and the White House.

What YOU can do
Have you applied for a visa to visit Tibet recently or in the past few years? Whether your application was accepted or denied, we want to hear about your experience. Provide ICT with feedback, including a description of the process, required permits and other measures that impeded your freedom to travel to Tibetan areas. Feedback will be kept confidential and can be shared through this quick online questionnaire.

TAKE THE SURVEY

HISTORY OF RATA

HISTORY OF RATA

Dec. 19, 2018: Thanks to extensive efforts by members of Congress, Tibetan-Americans, Tibet groups and ICT members, Reciprocal Access to Tibet becomes law.

March 14, 2019: More than 30 parliamentarians across Europe publish an op-ed calling for reciprocal access to Tibet for their own countries.

March 25, 2019: The State Department submits its first-ever report to Congress on access to Tibet. The report includes a scathing assessment of the lack of access Chinese authorities gave US diplomats and other officials, journalists and tourists to Tibetan areas in 2018. The State Department will have to report to Congress annually from now on.

March 29, 2019: The Foreign Correspondents’ Club of China issues a position paper calling for “unfettered access to the Tibet Autonomous Region and all Tibetan-inhabited regions” of China.

Read more about RATA’s amazing history—including the long journey it took over many years to finally become law.

Dec. 19, 2018: Thanks to extensive efforts by members of Congress, Tibetan-Americans, Tibet groups and ICT members, Reciprocal Access to Tibet becomes law.

March 14, 2019: More than 30 parliamentarians across Europe publish an op-ed calling for reciprocal access to Tibet for their own countries.

March 25, 2019: The State Department submits its first-ever report to Congress on access to Tibet. The report includes a scathing assessment of the lack of access Chinese authorities gave US diplomats and other officials, journalists and tourists to Tibetan areas in 2018. The State Department will have to report to Congress annually from now on.

March 29, 2019: The Foreign Correspondents’ Club of China issues a position paper calling for “unfettered access to the Tibet Autonomous Region and all Tibetan-inhabited regions” of China.

Read more about RATA’s amazing history—including the long journey it took over many years to finally become law.

READ MORE ABOUT RATA